Septic Toilet Cleaning Recipe

If you’re on an acreage property, chances are high that your toilet is also connected to a septic tank. Having a septic tank on your property is like having your own simple sewerage plant. It’s a great system and relatively easy to maintain, but you do need to keep a few things in mind when cleaning…

To ensure the bacteria in the septic tank are kept alive to break down the waste matter, it’s important to use natural cleaners that don’t disrupt and kill off the bacteria. If the bacteria in your septic system begin to die, a crust begins to form on the top of the septic tank and the solids in the tank begin to turn hard. When this happens, if the septic tank is not pumped out, contents of the tank can gradually turn into hard dirt which needs to be broken up and mixed with water before it can be pumped out. This hard buildup can block the pipes and also cause blockages in the trenches and result in the tank overflowing when new waste is flushed down as there’s nowhere else for it to go.

To see what a septic tank is and how it works, please see our Septic Tank Cleaning page.

There are many natural cleaning options available these days including products labelled as “septic safe”, however, we don’t recommend using these. The best cleaners to use are the simple, all natural products you may already have in your kitchen or laundry and below are a couple of recipes to keep your toilet fresh.

Everyday cleaning recipe for septic toilets

This recipe is good for cleaning your toilets on a regular basis or your normal cleaning schedule. It’s a cleaning powerhouse combination of bicarb and vinegar which contain disinfectant, solvent and deodoriser properties while still being all natural and gentle enough not to disrupt the bacteria in your tank.

Ingredients

  • White vinegar
  • 1 tbsp bicarb soda (also known as bicarbonate of soda or baking soda)
  • Empty spray bottle



Method

  • Fill an empty spray bottle with normal white household vinegar and spray around the inside of the toilet bowl.
  • Sprinkle a heaped tablespoon of bicarb soda into the bowl
  • Scrub the toilet thoroughly with the foaming vinegar and bicarb mixture
  • Flush the toilet and you’re done!
Everyday cleaning recipe for septic toilets

Heavy duty cleaning recipe for septic toilets

This heavy duty cleaner is still natural but is better for deep cleaning the toilet or removing hard stains.

Ingredients

  • White vinegar
  • 1/2 cup Borax
  • Empty spray bottle



Method

  • Fill an empty spray bottle with normal white household vinegar and spray around the inside of the toilet bowl.
  • Sprinkle the borax into the toilet bowl, concentrating more on the stained areas
  • Wait a few minutes to allow the mixture to work on the stains
  • Scrub the toilet thoroughly with the foaming vinegar and borax mixture
  • If you still find that there’s stubborn stains in the toilet that won’t go away, leave the mixture for a few hours to penetrate the stains before scrubbing.
Heavy duty cleaning recipe for septic toilets
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Find Out More About Septic Tanks

Don’t forget, just cleaning the toilet with natural cleaners isn’t enough to keep your system healthy if there’s other items entering your septic that aren’t good for it. For more tips on maintaining your septic tank and what you can flush down the toilet see our Septic Tank Cleaning page

In a well functioning septic tank, the bacteria will slowly break down the solids, and sludge will gradually build up on the bottom of the tank. Once the tank reaches 30% sludge, councils recommend that the tank be pumped out. We can test your tank to determine the sludge levels and recommend if pump out is needed. Please contact us today to book in your septic tank pump out or to be placed on a regular servicing cycle and we’ll call you when it’s due.

2019-10-07T23:07:21+00:00